Traditional haiku consist of 17 on (also known as morae though often loosely translated as "syllables"), in three phrases of 5, 7, and 5 on, respectively. In English, the syllable count varies because Japanese and English syllables are different. The rule is 17 syllables or less.

A kigo (seasonal reference), usually drawn from a saijiki, an extensive but defined list of such terms.

Modern Japanese haiku are increasingly unlikely to follow the tradition of 17 on or to take nature as their subject but the use of juxtaposition continues to be honored in both traditional and modern haiku. There is a common, although relatively recent, a perception that the images juxtaposed must be directly observed everyday objects or occurrences.

In Japanese, haiku are traditionally printed in a single vertical line while haiku in English often appear in three lines to parallel the three phrases of Japanese haiku.

Previously called hokku, haiku was given its current name by the Japanese writer Masaoka Shiki at the end of the 19th century.
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HAIKU 101 - August
Instructor: MariVal Bayles (Gypsy Blue Rose)
Only $99.00
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Start Date: Monday, August 7th, 2017
Duration: Four Weeks
Class Size: 7 Students
Seats Left: 7

Class begins on August 7th and ends on August 31st. We will meet in the chatroom on Mondays and Thursdays at 5:00 pm PST/8:00 pm EST for four weeks. At our first class, we can negotiate the best time for all of us and I am available anytime via fanstory private message.

Haiku is a very short form of Japanese poetry. It is typically characterized by three qualities:

The essence of haiku is "cutting". This is often represented by the juxtaposition of two images or ideas and a kireji ("cutting word") between them, a kind of verbal punctuation mark which signals the moment of separation and colors the manner in which the juxtaposed elements are related.

Traditional haiku consist of 17 on (also known as morae though often loosely translated as "syllables"), in three phrases of 5, 7, and 5 on, respectively. In English, the syllable count varies because Japanese and English syllables are different. The rule is 17 syllables or less.

A kigo (seasonal reference), usually drawn from a saijiki, an extensive but defined list of such terms.

Modern Japanese haiku are increasingly unlikely to follow the tradition of 17 on or to take nature as their subject but the use of juxtaposition continues to be honored in both traditional and modern haiku. There is a common, although relatively recent, a perception that the images juxtaposed must be directly observed everyday objects or occurrences.

In Japanese, haiku are traditionally printed in a single vertical line while haiku in English often appear in three lines to parallel the three phrases of Japanese haiku.

Previously called hokku, haiku was given its current name by the Japanese writer Masaoka Shiki at the end of the 19th century.


We will read, write, and discuss haiku in class. The classroom gives us an opportunity to ask questions and get immediate answers. We can talk with each other as if we were in the same room. I will provide reading material and assignments to get you comfortable writing and reviewing haiku.

The Haiku Course Objectives

1. Defining haiku and all its components
2. Becoming acquainted with haiku history
3. Become an active participant in learning
4. Examine the differences between traditional and contemporary haiku
5. Learn to write effective haiku reviews
6 .Learn the difference between senryu and haiku
7. Learn to use the haiku rules effectively
8. Gain understanding of why some haiku rules are contradicting.

CLASS ONE
OBJECTIVES Defining haiku and all its components and a brief introduction to the history of haiku.
ACTIVITIES READ AND WRITE ASSIGNMENTS
CLASS DISCUSSIONS
STUDENTS PRESENTATIONS
TEAM PROJECTS
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CLASS TWO
OBJECTIVES Becoming acquainted with traditional haiku
ACTIVITIES READ AND WRITE ASSIGNMENTS
CLASS DISCUSSIONS
STUDENTS PRESENTATIONS
TEAM PROJECTS

CLASS THREE
OBJECTIVES Becoming acquainted with rules of haiku
ACTIVITIES READ AND WRITE ASSIGNMENTS
CLASS DISCUSSIONS
STUDENTS PRESENTATIONS
TEAM PROJECTS

CLASS FOUR
OBJECTIVES Examining tanka and the origins of haiku
ACTIVITIES READ AND WRITE ASSIGNMENTS
CLASS DISCUSSIONS
STUDENTS PRESENTATIONS
TEAM PROJECTS

CLASS FIVE
OBJECTIVES writing haiku in groups
ACTIVITIES READ AND WRITE ASSIGNMENTS
CLASS DISCUSSIONS
STUDENTS PRESENTATIONS
TEAM PROJECTS

CLASS SIX
OBJECTIVES how to get the most of your haiku posts
ACTIVITIES READ AND WRITE ASSIGNMENTS
CLASS DISCUSSIONS
STUDENTS PRESENTATIONS
TEAM PROJECTS

CLASS SEVEN
OBJECTIVES Learning how to review haiku
ACTIVITIES READ AND WRITE ASSIGNMENTS
CLASS DISCUSSIONS
STUDENTS PRESENTATIONS
TEAM PROJECTS

CLASS EIGHT
OBJECTIVES Acquiring Haiku resources
ACTIVITIES READ AND WRITE ASSIGNMENTS
CLASS DISCUSSIONS
STUDENTS PRESENTATIONS
TEAM PROJECTS


Instructor: MariVal Bayles, member of the Haiku Society of America



Instructor: MariVal Bayles
About The Instructor: MariVal Bayles is a published author and experienced instructor. She received a Bachelor's Degree in Business Management from The University of Phoenix. Her books, "Gypsy's Haiku, Haiku Anthology, and Hora Haiku" are on sale at Amazon USA/Europe. She is a strong advocate of hands-on, inquiry-based learning, she involves her students in a variety of haiku styles and media. MariVal Bayles IS member of the Haiku Society of America.

Only $99.00
Includes a free two month upgraded membership! Details
Please Sign In or Create A Free Account first.