Vengeance of the Devil
Some Deals you shouldn't make
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Reviews from
Simple Goodbye


Dropping out of FanStory

  39 total reviews 
Comment by
LisaMay
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The change of location sounds nice - new beginnings in your relaxing garden. Thank you for your past stories; I have enjoyed reading about your life (and have been concerned for you). I send love and best wishes for an easier time for you.


 Comment Written 29-Sep-2019



reply by the author on 30-Sep-2019
    Thank you very much.

reply by the author on 30-Sep-2019
    Going blind has been extremely difficult and very hard to adjust to.
Comment by
Raul1
JOSE CONDE
Miami
 
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I like how you structured this story. I didn't know that you felt that way about Fanstory. Interesting information you have here. I understand now. Excellent work!


 Comment Written 29-Sep-2019



reply by the author on 30-Sep-2019
    Thank you. I do plan to stick around and so some reviewing and occasionally post something.

reply by Raul1 on 30-Sep-2019
    You're welcome.

reply by the author on 30-Sep-2019
    Thanks.

reply by Raul1 on 30-Sep-2019
    You're welcome.

reply by the author on 06-Oct-2019
    Thank you.

reply by Raul1 on 06-Oct-2019
    You're welcome.
Comment by
Bill Pinder
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Thanks for sharing this goodbye notice to the fan story people. And good luck in your new home. Hope you enjoy it. Thanks for all your writing from the past.
Bill


 Comment Written 29-Sep-2019



reply by the author on 30-Sep-2019
    Thank you.

reply by the author on 30-Sep-2019
    You are welcome.
Comment by
Rikki66
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Sorry to hear your problems are mounting. May God bless you and help in your recovery.)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
Rikki LXVI


 Comment Written 23-Sep-2019



reply by the author on 24-Sep-2019
    Thanks for the positive words and encouragement. Going blind can be so very stressful.

reply by Rikki66 on 25-Sep-2019
    A friend told me he never saw clearer than when he lost his vision.
    LXVI
Comment by
Cranial Thinker
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Hello my very best friend ever, join my ranks as psychotherapy I've been in since whenever I hope you have greater success at it than I am having, as every time I begin to go in the right direction my therapist leaves and I have to start all over again as they do not check past notes. Asperger's Syndrome I am going to have to google that I would like to know/understand as much as I can about it. It sounds like you have a good therapist. Please know that I am sending positive thoughts your way. Cranial Thinker


 Comment Written 23-Sep-2019



reply by the author on 23-Sep-2019
    Fortunately, I don't have that problem.
Comment by
2019 Script Writer of the Year
Bill Schott
 
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This is an astonishing discovery, Sasha. I was a high school teacher and have had several Asperger students. My niece's son also has Asperger's. Each of those people displayed different levels of abilities, but most were high-functioning with limited problems dealing with others. If you have come this far without it being suggested or realized before now, you may be just barely on the spectrum.


 Comment Written 22-Sep-2019



reply by the author on 23-Sep-2019
    I think you are right. I am considered low on the spectrum.
Comment by
Susan X Smith
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Thanks for your true story. Years ago I was a camp counselor for mentally disabled children including those who were severely autistic. After that Asperger's doesn't seem so bad since it is much milder. While I don't have personal experience I understand that those afflicted can still accomplish much and lead very productive lives. I do have opinions about psychotherapy though, and I suggest you shop around and get someone you really feel comfortable with. It is important that you "click." Trust your instincts. Don't let anyone bamboozle you.


 Comment Written 21-Sep-2019



reply by the author on 23-Sep-2019
    Here in Mexico it is difficult to doctor hope. Speaking English is the main obstacle.
Comment by
Gail Denham
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I'm so very sorry to hear this - and we will miss you on Fanstory - I pray that you find some good answers which will help you. There must be some meds that will help? I hope you will keep writing, even as you go through this - because you will help other people. Blessings and a prayer.


 Comment Written 21-Sep-2019



reply by the author on 23-Sep-2019
    I do plan to continue writing, just not as often.
Comment by
pbomar1115
 
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I looked up your diagnosis and did not see it as a problem for a person. In fact, I live in a society that dislikes intelligence at any level. Any signs of potential development to learn must be stopped immediately. Hang in there, Sasha.

Phillip


 Comment Written 21-Sep-2019



reply by the author on 23-Sep-2019
    I love intelligence and cannot imagine living in an area without it.

reply by pbomar1115 on 23-Sep-2019
    I understand, Sasha.

    Phillip
Comment by
Susan Larson
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I'm sorry to hear that, yet at least you have a diagnosis and that must be some comfort for you. My closest encounter with autism and Asperger's Syndrome was as a newspaper columnist when I wrote about a young man who was valedictorian of his class. You can read it below.

Valedictorians speak of varied victories


I never experienced the challenge of delivering a valedictory speech, mainly because I never rose to the challenge of being top of my class in the first place. And today, with the rigorous math and science requirements we didn't have back then, that challenge is even greater.
On May 23, after my granddaughter Kaylynne sat down with fellow Dacula High School graduates and wearing her National Honor Society Cords - another honor I never claimed - I was most impressed with valedictorian Andrew Udell's message. I could relate to his academic challenges and to Mr. Udell I extend my congratulations.
That very morning another valedictorian spoke at the commencement for Collins Hill High School, where my great nephew Caleb graduated. That speech was delivered by Manav Dutta, but I must say, I didn't relate to his challenges in the way I did to Mr. Udell's.
After a lighthearted greeting with jokes about senioritis, Dutta proclaimed, "It's time to finally get back on the right path."
He went on to say, " I challenge you all to find your passion," acknowledging that many fellow students have "faced challenges that were physical, financial, or spiritual."
He then went on to tell his own story:
"I too struggled as a child. I have Asperger's Syndrome. I was diagnosed at age 3. I always had problems with understanding people and talking to them. It's the reason why I'm known as a bit quirky even today. I didn't even speak until I was 3, and I never liked talking to other people. I was stubborn and always preferred to play alone. I had no sense of myself or other people at all; I was disabled. My parents never thought I'd be able to attend a regular school or even function independently. They thought I'd be institutionalized for the rest of my life. If you've ever watched the Rain Man, that's how they thought I was going to turn out.
But look at me: A disabled child, with seemingly no hope of improving, has become the valedictorian of Collins Hill. More than a decade of constant struggle and hardship, and I now stand on this podium. Only a few people know what I have gone through: My brother, my mom, my grandparents, my aunt, my uncle, and my friends. They all have helped me in some way. But no one has supported me like my mom. She is the major reason for my success. When I was in 7th grade and was perpetually bullied, she told me to focus on my studies so that I could one day overcome my situation in life. She is the main reason that I stand now on this podium."
Mr. Dutta then encouraged fellow graduates to set a goal to "live the best life you can. "
That last statement I think we all can relate to. And to Mr. Dutta, I extend my congratulations.


Collins Hill grad conquers challenges

We all have challenges when we commence into the world from high school, be it a job, military training or college. My first challenge was trying to cram 20 pairs of shoes into a six square foot closet I had to share with two other roommates.
Manav Dutta's challenges were, well, quite a bit more challenging.
Manav, who has always dealt with the challenges of autism, really rose above them when he delivered the valedictory speech for the class of 2013 at Collins Hill.
But when Manav entered Georgia Tech as a Computer Science major, he encountered new and different challenges.
He said when he moved into his dorm he was amazed at the variety of people he clicked with. "I met some guys just like me and enjoyed sharing my nerdiness with them," he said. "Like any other student, I played video games, traded cards, and went on crazy late-night adventures to Waffle House and McDonalds. When classes started, I wasn't daunted. I aced everything just like in high school. For real challenges, I went to epic programming contests called hackathons and participated in events like tricycle races and epic dodge ball tournaments."
"Tech ain't a challenge at all," he said. "My professors were really nice and I really related to them." In his freshman year he maintained a 3.5 GPA, worked on a research team to produce a thermomechanical model of salt rocks and spent time probing the secrets of artificial intelligence. He even improved on his already proficient public speaking skills, which he used at his mom's wedding.
But then came the challenges. Mostly social. Even though he was socializing with people on his floor, he said he couldn't understand them at all.
"I felt like they were from another planet," he said. "Two in particular were cruel towards me because of my autistic characteristics, even though I tried to explain it to them. I felt overwhelmed trying to balance all the classes and extracurriculars. I felt a growing sense of detachment from the professors and other adults. Eventually in October, a vicious conflict erupted culminating in No Contact orders being placed between me and the two of them."
After that, Manav said he met some students from Wheeler High School with whom he really bonded. Things got better, but he said the people on his floor tried to get him on trouble on false accusations. Even though Tech has an autism support group, Manav chose not to seek help because he had his friends to back him up. Through it all he said he had the support of his new friends. He rose above the challenges and says he's just put his freshman year behind him.
Now Manav is taking on a new challenge of spending his sophomore year in Germany. And he's already taken up the challenge of learning German. No matter what the challenge, I believe this young man will rise above it.





 Comment Written 21-Sep-2019



reply by the author on 23-Sep-2019
    Thank for he uplifting response. I feel this syndrome is not a negative drawback. It has many positive aspects that I feel comfortable with.

reply by Susan Larson on 23-Sep-2019
    I think you just see and experience things differently. And so do I. I am a wee bit dyslexic and here is my column about that.

    It Makes your Head Spin

    "It must be in my husband's family," I said when the reading specialist said my son's dyslexia was hereditary. Later as I was seated across the table from him, I read something aloud - upside-down.
    "So, it?s you!" he exclaimed. "If you can read that well upside-down, you?re dyslexic."
    Dyslexic? I thought I had a special talent. I watched other kindergarten teachers struggle to hold the book at their side so children could see the pictures as they read. I just held the book in my lap and read upside down. It all looked the same to me.
    But then, I still can't set the table without thinking about which side my vaccination is on. Where I grew up, Lake Erie was visible for miles, and it was always north. In Atlanta, I actually asked people how they found North without a lake. I tried using Stone Mountain as a landmark for East, but when I moved to Gwinnett County, I couldn't readjust to it's being West. And if it was ever North, it meant I was lost beyond hope.
    At a Bar Mitzvah reception, a friend asked if I?d arrange the name tags in alphabetical order. I was standing on the right side of the table, so I started from there. When she gave me a puzzled look, I realized what I had done. Not wanting to appear stupid, I said, "You did want me to do it in Hebrew, didn't you?"
    Then there was tennis. I wasn't too bad at the game, but I couldn?t call shots. All I saw was a ball next to a line. Years later at a reading conference, teachers asked why dyslexic children who couldn't differentiate between b and d can't just learn them 'wrong' and memorize them that way.
    "Because," I explained," all they see is a ball next to a line."
    Once, while discussing it with my doctor, I said even though it?s caused me embarrassment, I still see it as a strength as well as a weakness. Dyslexic kids take puzzles that baffle the brilliant and assemble them in seconds. It seems that for architects, it might be helpful to revolve around structures multi-dimensionally. And Leonardo da Vinci did a lot of his writing backwards. Am I in good company?
    I?m dyslexic, too,? my doctor said, ?and it's an advantage in surgery. Some doctors make a big deal about where they stand to view the body. I can stand anywhere. It all looks the same to me."
    OK, so one less doctor jockeying for a position in the operating room may be no big deal. But, hey, if we dyslexics can spin the world around in our heads, just think what we'd be able to do if we ever united and put our heads together. We?d give a whole new meaning to the word revolution!

    It Makes your Head Spin

    "It must be in my husband's family," I said when the reading specialist said my son's dyslexia was hereditary. Later as I was seated across the table from him, I read something aloud - upside-down.
    "So, it?s you!" he exclaimed. "If you can read that well upside-down, you?re dyslexic."
    Dyslexic? I thought I had a special talent. I watched other kindergarten teachers struggle to hold the book at their side so children could see the pictures as they read. I just held the book in my lap and read upside down. It all looked the same to me.
    But then, I still can't set the table without thinking about which side my vaccination is on. Where I grew up, Lake Erie was visible for miles, and it was always north. In Atlanta, I actually asked people how they found North without a lake. I tried using Stone Mountain as a landmark for East, but when I moved to Gwinnett County, I couldn't readjust to it's being West. And if it was ever North, it meant I was lost beyond hope.
    At a Bar Mitzvah reception, a friend asked if I?d arrange the name tags in alphabetical order. I was standing on the right side of the table, so I started from there. When she gave me a puzzled look, I realized what I had done. Not wanting to appear stupid, I said, "You did want me to do it in Hebrew, didn't you?"
    Then there was tennis. I wasn't too bad at the game, but I couldn?t call shots. All I saw was a ball next to a line. Years later at a reading conference, teachers asked why dyslexic children who couldn't differentiate between b and d can't just learn them 'wrong' and memorize them that way.
    "Because," I explained," all they see is a ball next to a line."
    Once, while discussing it with my doctor, I said even though it?s caused me embarrassment, I still see it as a strength as well as a weakness. Dyslexic kids take puzzles that baffle the brilliant and assemble them in seconds. It seems that for architects, it might be helpful to revolve around structures multi-dimensionally. And Leonardo da Vinci did a lot of his writing backwards. Am I in good company?
    I?m dyslexic, too,? my doctor said, ?and it's an advantage in surgery. Some doctors make a big deal about where they stand to view the body. I can stand anywhere. It all looks the same to me."
    OK, so one less doctor jockeying for a position in the operating room may be no big deal. But, hey, if we dyslexics can spin the world around in our heads, just think what we'd be able to do if we ever united and put our heads together. We?d give a whole new meaning to the word revolution!


reply by the author on 24-Sep-2019
    Thanks for the great comments about your experience with autism. I don't have autism, just a mild and functioning for called As[erger's Syndrome. I find in many ways it is very helpful and explains all the things I didn't understand about who I am and why I am the way I am.
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