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Sedoka
Write a Sedoka.

The Sedoka is an unrhymed poem made up of two three-line katauta with the following syllable counts: 5/7/7, 5/7/7. A Sedoka, pair of katauta as a single poem, may address the same subject from differing perspectives.

A katauta is an unrhymed three-line poem the following syllable counts: 5/7/7.


Example #1:
War Path

Fractured wanderer
leaving a tortured city,
hammocked insecurely.

Quenched of thirst for blood,
he may now respect beauty,
unappreciated 'fore.

Copyright © 2003 Christian Ugalde

Example #2:
Disturbing Raven

Dark clouds cloak the night;
chilly winds creak gnarled branches,
grasping as bony fingers.

Disturbed Raven squawks
at frightened children - screaming,
then laughing - they throw him treats.

Copyright © 2004 James Dean Chase

Example #3:
October 31st

Ghosties and goblins
Witches, black cats and broomsticks,
All Hallows Eve comes tonight.

Children coming by
arms out calling trick or treat
Hall-o-ween ghosts and goblins.

Copyright © 2004 Marion Gibson
5.00 member dollars  Poetry  Displayed  General  15 of 18 15.00 member dollars rjuselius
Diamante
A Diamante is a seven-lined contrast poem set up in a diamond shape. The first line begins with a noun/subject, and second line contains two adjectives that describe the beginning noun. The third line contains three words ending in -ing relating to the noun/subject. The forth line contains two words that describe the noun/subject and two that describe the closing synonym/antonym. If using an antonym for the ending, this is where the shift should occur. In the fifth line are three more -ing words describing the ending antonym/synonym, and the sixth are two more adjectives describing the ending antonym/synonym. The last line ends with the first noun's antonym or synonym.

To make it a bit simpler, here is a diagram.

Line 1: Noun or subject
Line 2: Two Adjectives describing the first noun/subject
Line 3: Three -ing words describing the first noun/subject
Line 4: Four words: two about the first noun/subject, two about the antonym/synonym
Line 5: Three -ing words about the antonym/synonym
Line 6: Two adjectives describing the antonym/synonym
Line 7: Antonym/synonym for the subject


Example #1:
Rain
humid, damp
refreshing, dripping, splattering
wet, slippery, cold, slushy
sliding, melting, freezing
frigid, icy
Snow


Copyright © 2000 Marie Summers

Example #2:

Kitten
cute, soft
purring, clawing, pouncing
playful, fur, fun, feline
pawing, licking, loving
bright-eyed, beautiful
Cat

Copyright © 2000 Marie Summers
5.00 member dollars  Poetry  Not Displayed  General  14 of 18 20.00 member dollars rjuselius
Funny poem about your job
Write a humorous poem about your job. It can be any job, but it has to rhyme.
5.00 member dollars  Poetry  Not Displayed  Humor  14 of 18 20.00 member dollars Contests
100 Word Horror
The challenge is to write a poem that contains some form of horror or thriller. No more than 100 words.
5.00 member dollars  Poetry  Not Displayed  General  15 of 18 15.00 member dollars Contests
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