Reviews from

Miscellaneous stories

Viewing comments for Chapter 4 "Lords of Creation"
Fiction and non-fiction prose

24 total reviews 
Comment from BeasPeas
Excellent
Not yet exceptional. When the exceptional rating is reached this is highlighted

No, it's going to be artificial intelligence. But speaking of greed, we're never satisfied. Take me for example. That's why I don't have any sweets in the house. I can't resist. If one is good, more are better. Good luck in the contest. Marilyn

 Comment Written 05-Feb-2019


reply by the author on 06-Feb-2019
    Ah yes, but what provides the impetus behind the development of AI? The desire for competitive advantage over our rivals. The ability to produce something for a few cents cheaper than someone else, because we don't have to pay human employees. More money in the bank for us. And of course, besides AI, almost every destructive thing we do is motivated by greed. We deny global warming because if we accepted it, we might have to shut down our filth-spewing coal fired power stations and build new, clean energy ones (ignoring the fact that it's already being demonstrated energy from renewables is cheaper to produce than fossil fuels). We create underclasses of disenfranchised people because a fleet of 100 private cars and a couple of jets isn't enough for some billionaire paying no tax. He needs 200 cars and half a dozen jets. It's all greed in the end. And no, we are never satisfied.

    Cheers, Marilyn -- much appreciated.
reply by BeasPeas on 07-Feb-2019
    Hi Craig.
    It's true that we're a consumer-oriented society. My comments to you were meant to be lighthearted--talking about AI and sweets.

    As for me, I'm one of the most un-materialistic persons you'll ever know and I like it that way. It's purposeful. I'm lucky to operate a computer and a microwave.

    Greed seems to bother a lot of people these days, but it's nothing new. It's just a recycled buzz word. What can be done about it? Something, nothing--or do we just complain about it? I think we have to ask ourselves, "what would I personally give up to help the cause? Will my small contribution to the cause help? Am I willing to personally adopt an entire needy family to live in my home with me footing the bill for everything to make one group of people comfortable? If the answer is yes, do it. If the answer is no, don't. Now multiple that x millions of people--the yes people and the no people. Are all of them on the same page? Can you make any of those you disagree with do anything?

    The philosophy of stoicism says that the only thing we can control is our own thinking."

    However, the truth of it is that many jobs ARE being lost and won't return because of AI/robotics. The push for a higher hourly wage is one of the culprits. It has prompted business to "tool up"--a one time tax-deductible huge cost, but it will pay off for companies in the long run. Business won't have the headaches of dealing with disgruntled employees, salaries, medical benefits, or vacations. Robotics will work tirelessly 24/7. It's faster and more efficient. I'm not saying that's good. In my opinion AI is already a huge threat to us. As time passes, many professions will be eliminated entirely and humans will need a permanent source of welfare to keep them fed, housed and clothed.

    Re: The environment. Politicians who tout pulling back on cars/jets etc., talk out of two sides of their mouths and are huge offenders themselves. Until we can find a substitute for fossil fuels, though, we're stuck with what we've got. No one will voluntarily give up his/her car, Smart phones, computers, Alexas, and other gadgets. Would you? We've gone beyond turning back to a simpler time. Unless China/India get on board with agreeing to curb their carbon footprint the rest of the world is spitting in the wind.

    There are some excellent energy saving, environmentally friendly products/inventions being worked on. I read a lot. See--Popular Mechanics, Pouplar Science, Wired and other futuristic scientific magazines (on line or twitter). You will be encouraged and hopeful by some of these forward-looking proposals that may give you some peace of mind.

    If I'm right, you have won or placed in the contest for this entry. Congratulations.
    Marilyn
reply by the author on 07-Feb-2019
    I think we agree on some points, not so much on others. You are right about the fact that there are already many answers. Smart people and smart governments are already implementing them. Troglodytes are not. I do read, by the way; I also watch a lot of quality TV documentaries, current affairs shows, debates and conferences on TV and Netflix. TED talks can be both informative and entertaining. The Festival of Dangerous ideas and other I-squared content, and programs like Q&A in this country should be mandatory viewing for all.

    I suspect you're wrong about the contest, but thanks :)

    Craig
reply by BeasPeas on 07-Feb-2019
    Unless my eyes deceive me you won third place. Check out your profile page and home page.
reply by the author on 07-Feb-2019
    Oh, whoops. I forgot it had been decided. Someone even left me a note, and I responded. Must be getting old ;-)
Comment from WalkerMan
Exceptional
This work has reached the exceptional level

You are so right about this, Craig. Our innate aspiring to better ourselves is beneficial ONLY if it does not extend to taking from others (or nature) more than we really need, just to feel superior. What has always been true of greed is that it tends to be insatiable, and all manner of Evil flows from that.

Socialism/communism appeals to the greed of the populace to take from the "rich" who earned their way to that status through creativity and business sense; but the secretly greedy leaders plunder whatever wealth the people have and hoard it for themselves. The system ultimately collapses when the impoverished people finally revolt; but, even if the greedy leaders are punished, the wealth stolen from the people is never really restored to its rightful owners in any reasonable way (especially because many are dead by then).

The proponents of a "New World Order" are the most evilly greedy humans ever. In order to control the people enough for those few to steal the entire world's wealth with impunity, they plot to reduce world population to under three hundred thousand -- making the combined hundred million murders attributable to Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot, and other socialist/communist dictators of the twentieth century look like a stubbed toe by comparison.

To that end, they are geoengineering the world with toxic nano-particle chemtrails, vaccines whose toxic components will cause cancer and/or other diseases in the future, toxic fluoride in the water to weaken bones and lower intelligence, GMO frankenfoods devoid of nutrition but loaded with carcinogenic pesticides, dumbing down the populace through miseducation and fake news to prevent reasoning that might foster rebellion, and touting the hoax that we all must be taxed to prevent "climate change" -- which their geoengineering may actually be causing in local areas, as humans simply do not have the power to affect worldwide climate by ordinary daily activities. The computer models they use to "prove" their claims suffer from "garbage in, garbage out" because they cherry-pick the input data to assure the results they want.

Add in their fanning of the flames of hatred among increasingly splintered groups labeled by (what should be irrelevant) surface characteristics, and the insane promotion of abortion (with Pol Pot's style of elimination of anyone over a certain age and/or too well educated likely next on the agenda), plus suppression of the morality that Western religions promote, and no one will have the conscience to consider murder a crime.

If the trend is not soon reversed, the eventual effect likely WILL be humanity's end from some devastating form of warfare and/or a pandemic (intentionally unleashed or not) that no one has sufficient immunity to withstand.

Then, as Sara Teasdale warned in her poem, "There Will Come Soft Rains" (from her 1920 book, Flame and Shadow), whatever creatures in nature that manage to survive will not mind that we are gone.

You make your point superbly in this highly plausible brief dialog.

 Comment Written 02-Feb-2019


reply by the author on 02-Feb-2019
    Sara's is a truly beautiful poem. I suspect that "not minding" is something of an understatement -- they'll be elated to see the back of us. Thanks for the kind words and the delightful rating. As for the political commentary, it is hard to imagine I could agree less with every word, but Fanstory is a broad church ;-)

    Cheers, Craig
reply by WalkerMan on 02-Feb-2019
    You are most welcome, Craig. We can agree to disagree about the rest. -- Mike
Comment from --Turtle.
Exceptional
This work has reached the exceptional level

A strong entry, Craig.

Nicely setup to engage interest and curiosity using dialogue to move the question and very quickly set up a flash image and bit of food for thought at the end. Effective ending that leaves a warning/ parallel for present to future.

Compact, easy to read, easy to digest, highlighting complicated dynamics of human failings perhaps in the eyes of whatever comes down the line.

 Comment Written 02-Feb-2019


reply by the author on 02-Feb-2019
    I would love to have a crystal ball to see what, if indeed anything, succeeds us, Turtle. I say "if anything", because it is possible nothing might survive our destructive capabilities. As always, your thoughtful and kind comments are accepted with much gratitude.

    Craig
Comment from Pearl Edwards
Excellent
Not yet exceptional. When the exceptional rating is reached this is highlighted

A good little Dribble Flash fiction story about self destruction, cleverly told in conversation. Good one Craig and good luck in the contest.
cheers.
valda

 Comment Written 02-Feb-2019


reply by the author on 02-Feb-2019
    Thanks very much for the good wishes and kind comments, Valda :) Cheers, Craig
Comment from Sandra du Plessis
Excellent
Not yet exceptional. When the exceptional rating is reached this is highlighted

A very well-written dribble flash fiction. Indeed, homo-sapiens seem to be their own worst enemy when they start getting greedy. They first destroy all other's lives around them and at the end they destroy themselves.

 Comment Written 02-Feb-2019


reply by the author on 02-Feb-2019
    So true, Sandra. Thanks very much for the astute comments. Craig
Comment from Ideasaregems-Dawn
Excellent
Not yet exceptional. When the exceptional rating is reached this is highlighted

Okay. But who is talking? If humankind is extinct, I mean... How about eliminating "sweetheart" and replacing it with "almost" before 'extinct'? Just a thought, but then I might be way off. I'm not terribly with it today.

 Comment Written 02-Feb-2019


reply by the author on 02-Feb-2019
    Apparently not. The "who" is whatever species succeeds us in the future, and is viewing us at the exhibit. Obviously, not human.
reply by Ideasaregems-Dawn on 02-Feb-2019
    Oh, of course. Forgive me. Been locked up in the house for days... -38C temps.
Comment from Debbie Pope
Excellent
Not yet exceptional. When the exceptional rating is reached this is highlighted

Pretty profound for 50 words, Craig. I agree that the tale of Homo Sapiens is all related to greed somehow. As I was reading, I did not know what vice you were referring to. I did not guess greed.
Nice job.

 Comment Written 02-Feb-2019


reply by the author on 02-Feb-2019
    I think all of the things which threaten us as a species are basically driven by wanting what we don't have, and most likely, don't need. Thanks, Debbie :)
Comment from trimple
Exceptional
This work has reached the exceptional level

Good evening, Craig

How bloody right you are. It seems that the very rich and greedy few, have been poisoned and see little past their well-groomed noses. Imagine an alien species landing here on planet fucked, and seeing the disparity between rich n poor... I wouldn't be surprised if they just exterminated us, having deemed us to be the most selfish gene of all.

There is an enormous difference between want and need.but then again... how many pairs of shoes do you have?

I think we're all to blame...

Really good write, that could, of course, be interpreted in many ways... But this is what I saw.

Should do well :)


kind regards

tracey



 Comment Written 01-Feb-2019


reply by the author on 02-Feb-2019
    I have one pair of "joggers" which serve 99% of my needs, and a pair of rubber gumboots, for when I'm walking in the tall grass with the snakes lol

    Yeah, ok, just call me "Imelda" ;-)

    Thanks for the terrific comments and glowing stars, Tracey.

    Cheers,
    Craig
reply by trimple on 02-Feb-2019
    The pleasure was all mine :)
Comment from lyenochka
Excellent
Not yet exceptional. When the exceptional rating is reached this is highlighted

A profound message, Craig. And though I don't know the age of the child, (I was thinking much younger with the child using 'daddy') but was impressed with the use of the word, "pathogen!"
Best wishes to you in the contest!

 Comment Written 01-Feb-2019


reply by the author on 01-Feb-2019
    You're quite right, Helen. I was thinking seven or eight, and odds are some that age won't have heard that word. "Viruses" it is, thanks for the tip! :) Cheers, Craig
Comment from Gloria ....
Excellent
Not yet exceptional. When the exceptional rating is reached this is highlighted

Greed could be considered a pathogen, yes? Excellent work friend Craig, and best of luck to you with the Contest Committee.

Gloria

 Comment Written 01-Feb-2019


reply by the author on 01-Feb-2019
    I guess it could, Gloria. It certainly causes disease. Or is it a disease? Thanks once again :) Craig