Contact Us      
         Join today or login
You are using an outdated version. Writing will not be shown properly in many cases. Click here to use the current version.

Status

New Here?
Sign Up
Fast! Three Questions.

Already a member?
Login


Contests

100 Word Flash Fiction
Deadline: In 2 Days

Haiku Poetry Contest
Deadline: In 3 Days

ABC Poetry Contest
Deadline: Mar 9th

6 Word Poetry
Deadline: Mar 13th

Cinquain Poetry
Deadline: Mar 16th


Rank

Poet: None
Author: None
Novel: None
Reviewer:None
Votes: None





 Category:  Commentary and Philosophy Script
  Posted: August 19, 2019      Views: 30

Print It
Save to Bookcase
View Reviews
Rate This
Make Reader Pick
Promote This


 ABOUT
BRETT MATTHEW WEST 

You are enjoying another piece of writing penned by the NUMBER 5 RANKED SCRIPT WRITER OF THE YEAR FOR 2019!!!

My reviews are mere suggestions. Feel free to use anything that provides assistance and/or chuck the whole shebang.

For 2 - more...

He is an accomplished novelist and is currently at the #23 spot on the rankings.

Portfolio | Become A Fan
Excellent
Not yet exceptional. When the exceptional rating is reached this is highlighted
The most common hormone abnormality in dogs
"Couch Potatoes #5: Hypoythyroid" by Brett Matthew West



Hypothyroidism

WEDNESDAY: MORNING: CLINIC:

FADE IN:

Zack Bryan: This morning we are remoting to you live from the Fullwood Animal Clinic. My guest is Dr. Brent Acosta. I'm Zack Bryan, and welcome to Couch Potatoes. I see you have a little buddy with you there, Doc.

Dr. Acosta: Thanks for having me, Zack. This is Seth, and he's being treated for hypothyroidism.

Zack Bryan: What kind of ailment is that?

Dr. Acosta: Hypothyroidism is the most common hormone affliction dogs can endure. In Seth's case, he's not making enough hormones to meet the needs of his body. That's typical with hypothyroidism.

Zack Bryan: Why is the number of thyroid hormones a dog produces important to them, Doc?

Dr, Acosta: Because thyroid hormones control a dog's metabolism, Zack. Too many thyroid hormones and their blood pressure and heart rate will increase. On top of that, their body burns muscle, and they become skinny and debilitated.

Zack Bryan: Aren't weight gain, lethargy, and poor hair coat manifestations of inadequate thyroid hormones, Doc?

Dr. Acosta: They can be, Zack. Most of the time, an immune-mediated inflammation develops in a dog's thyroid gland and leads to cellular destruction and the replacement of functional tissue with fibrosis. It's very similar to what we humans know as Hashimoto's Disease.

Zack Bryan: Doesn't this phase almost always go unnoticed in dogs and offers no obvious symptoms?

Dr. Acosta: When thyroid levels drop, the pituitary gland dumps TSH into the circulation system to attempt to stimulate thyroid hormone production.

Zack Bryan: Does that help any, Doc?

Dr. Acosta: Perhaps, for a short while. Then, the thyroid glands become less able to respond and thyroid hormone levels drop low enough that serious problems may occur.

Zack Bryan: Are there any breeds that are predisposed to develop hypothyroidism?

Dr. Acosta: There are. Great Danes, dachshunds, boxers, Irish Setters, and a variety of mixed breeds.

Zack Bryan: How are dogs tested for hypothyroidism, Doc?

Dr. Acosta: Diagnosis may be made through routine screening. However, if your dog exhibits weight gain, cold or thickened skin, elevated cholesterol, symmetrical hair thinning, or lethargy, your vet may test them for hypothyroidism.

Zack Bryan: What is the standard test for hypothyroidism?

Dr. Acosta: A T4 thyroid test. This will indicate if the dog's thyroid hormones are at an adequate level. And, the Free T4 test identifies how much thyroid hormone is available to your dog.

Zack Bryan: What is the treatment for dogs with hypothyroidism, Doc?

Dr. Acosta: Thyroid supplements for the rest of the dog's life. And, the dosage may require periodic adjustments because the dog's pituitary gland's output may decrease even more with time.

Zack Bryan: We would like to thank Dr. Acosta for being our guest this morning. I'm Zack Bryan, and you're tuned into Couch Potatoes, your one-source show for everything dog.

FADE OUT:

Author Notes
TSH - thyroid-stimulating hormones




Duchshie, by Dick Lee Shia, selected to complement my script.

So, thanks Dick Lee Shia, for the use of your picture. It goes so nicely with my script.
Pays one point and 2 member cents. Artwork by Dick Lee Shia at FanArtReview.com

Share or Bookmark
Print It Save to Bookcase View Reviews Make Reader Pick Promote This
© Copyright 2016. Brett Matthew West All rights reserved.
Brett Matthew West has granted FanStory.com, its affiliates and its syndicates non-exclusive rights to display this work.

You need to login or register to write reviews.

It's quick! We only ask four questions to new members.

Interested in posting your own writing online? Click here to find out more.



Write a story or poem and submit your work to receive reviews on your writing. Publish short stories on our book writing site and enter the monthly contests. Guaranteed reviews for everything you write and you will be ranked. Information.


  Contact Us

© 2016 FanStory.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Terms under which this service is provided to you. Privacy Statement