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 Category:  Biographical Poetry
  Posted: January 12, 2019      Views: 63
Chapters:
 ...122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134... 

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 ABOUT
SANDRA DU PLESSIS 

Retired music teacher, and now trying to write my heart out, about what is going on in my mind.

I was asked a few times what my surname means. I only know it is from French origin. I did a Google search and I found the following explanati - more...

She is a top ranked author at the #49 position.

She is an accomplished poet and is currently at the #4 spot on this years rankings.


She is also an active reviewer and is holding the #2 spot on the top ranked reviewer list.

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Chapter 130 of the book 40. Humor, Fun and Poems about Life
Humor, Fun, Poems of Life - Vignette
"Surprise In The Middle Of The Night" by Sandra du Plessis
"I fell asleep quickly, for me, it is not the norm. Just after midnight, I was awakened by a thunderstorm, raging in the darkness. The rumble of thunder rattled windows, triggered the car alarm, right next to my bedroom.  The alarm stopped; the storm continued. I picked up my tablet, checked if there's something to read; a flash came over my screen that announced the 'Recognized Writer' of the month. I froze immediately, 'did I see my name?' I looked again and realized it was indeed my name. A shocking, pleasant surprise in the middle of the night."
 

Recognized

The book continues with When Grandma Has To Babysit. We will provide a link to it when you review this below.

Author Notes
Vignette
Definition of Vignette
Vignette is a small impressionistic scene, an illustration, a descriptive passage, a short essay, a fiction or nonfiction work focusing on one particular moment; or giving an impression about an idea, character, setting, mood, aspect, or object. Vignette is neither a plot nor a full narrative description, but a carefully crafted verbal sketch that might be part of some larger work or a complete description in itself.
Literally, a vignette is a French word that means 'little vine'. The printers, during the nineteenth century, would decorate their title pages with drawings of looping vines. Hence, the derivation of this term is that source of drawings. Contemporary ideas from the scenes shown in television and film scripts also have influenced vignettes.
Examples of Vignette in Literature
Example #1: In Our Time (By Ernest Hemingway)
"Maera lay still, his head on his arms, his face in the sand. He felt warm and sticky from the bleeding. Each time he felt the horn coming. Sometimes the bull only bumped him with his head. Once the horn went all the way through him and he felt it go into the sand ... Maera felt everything getting larger and larger and then smaller and smaller. Then it got larger and larger and larger and then smaller and smaller. Then everything commenced to run faster and faster as when they speed up a cinematograph film. Then he was dead."
In this impressionistic sketch, the author gives an illustration of the character Maera, who is a bullfighter that dies from injuries inflicted by a bull.
Example #2: An American Childhood (By Annie Dillard)
"Some boys taught me to play football. This was fine sport. You thought up a new strategy for every play and whispered it to the others. You went out for a pass, fooling everyone. Best, you got to throw yourself mightily at someone's running legs ... In winter, in the snow, there was neither baseball nor football, so the boys and I threw snowballs at passing cars. I got in trouble throwing snowballs, and have seldom been happier since."
In this excerpt, Dillard has used her personal experiences while growing up in Pittsburgh and describes the nature of American life. In this particular scene, she tells us how she learned to play football with the boys and offering this incident of her teenage years.
Function of Vignette
We often find vignettes in creative writing, as it provides a description to achieve an artistic effect. However, we also see its usage in prose and poetry. Writers use this device to explore a character and describe the setting of a scene. Vignettes give a deeper understanding of texts, as writers densely pack them with imagery and symbolism. Besides, it increases writers' language proficiency, as they use their language to its fullest by employing imagery to set a certain color and mood. Hence, the nature of vignettes is evocative and puts an impact on the senses of readers.
by Taboola

** I tried to write the Vignette in prose form, I hope it is acceptable.

Image courtesy of Google images free downloads.
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