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 Category:  Essay Non-Fiction
  Posted: October 3, 2019      Views: 32

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 ABOUT
BRETT MATTHEW WEST 
Pikesville finished 2nd in the Story in a Poem site contest for May 9, 2019!!!

Meeting Cody - Part Two nominated for Story of the Month for December 2017!!!

Unwanted Dog finished 3rd in the July 2017 Book of the Month Contest!!!
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He is a top ranked author at the #82 position.

He is an accomplished novelist and is currently at the #56 spot on the rankings.

He is an accomplished script writer and is currently at the #5 spot on the rankings.

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Excellent
Not yet exceptional. When the exceptional rating is reached this is highlighted
Qualities that make characters unforgetable
"Memorable Characters" by Brett Matthew West



Memorable characters possess unforgettable personalities. They are not just a white crayon on a white piece of paper; nor are they made of cardboard. There are many ways to create such characters. Here are some pointers to help them reach their ultimate destination.

A good sense of agency is critical. Characters need to move actively toward achieving their goal. They need to make decisions and attempt to control their own destiny as an independent operator within the confines of the storyline. Hand-in-hand with this, characters must be motivated by the desires they attempt to fill throughout the story.

Characters should have a touch of the fear of something. This fear should be present. It helps prevent characters from becoming robotic. Internal conflict is another must have for memorable characters, because that way they don't always know how best to achieve what they crave. Watching characters struggle helps draw readers closer to them. However, they also need to endure external conflicts. These can be twice as effective if they clash with the character's internal conflicts in some way.

Memorable characters need to connect to the other characters in the story, and they don't necessarily need to be positive connections. These connections pull and drag characters through the story. Memorable characters must also connect to readers, especially if they contain a little portion of the reader; like a mirror that allows readers to see themselves in the character.

Complexity provides layers and depth for memorable characters. They need to be exceptional at something. And, it can be internal, emotional, or intellectual. However, they also need a flaw that balances them out. If they are the best at something, make them the worst at something else.

Give them a unique voice. Make them sound like the character they are. How they say something, and what they say, makes all the difference in the world. While you're at it, make the character's appearance stand out and reveal pieces of them.

Emotions add soul to a character and expose them to readers. Use emotions to highlight who the character is.

Provide the character mysteries they are driven to resolve. They also need secrets unshared with anyone else. This creates tension for readers and complexities for the character.

The ability to surprise readers is another key element. Double-takes and fist bumps from readers can be elicited through a character's capabilities, emotions, and intelligence. Make the character much more than readers expect. But, make them consistent. They should also possess quirks that provide depth, and need a history as well as the "right" name. For instance, you wouldn't name them Dame Penelope Pitstop III and make them a garbage collector.

Give the character the capability to grow, have scope, and change. Readers like to go along on this journey with them. Make the character someone you want to spend time associating with. Accomplish this through gravity; make the character big and interesting, never boring.

Most important, memorable characters need a writer to bring them to life as only you can do. You are the puppeteer. Make them dance.

Go create!

Author Notes
True Grit, by Bob one oldreb, selected to complement my essay.

So, thanks Bob one oldred, for the use of your picture of John Wayne. It goes so nicely with my essay.
Pays one point and 2 member cents. Artwork by Bob one oldreb at FanArtReview.com

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